by Megan Richards February 10, 2020 2 min read

Last in our series on watering your air plants, is misting, a method that you can use  in-between normal soaking or dunking. Read more about the dunk method, and soaking in our previous blog posts. 

Misting is a good way to give your plant a little extra moisture if you notice that its leaves are looking a little dry, or if you live in a drier climate with not very much humidity in the air. This methodshould not be used as your plants only water source, as misting is most likely not enough water to allow your plant to thrive.

There is an exception to this rule though, the T. tectorum with its abundance of trichomes, prefers misting over soaking or dunking. If you have one of these guys, you may only need to mist once a month in a temperate climate, or weekly in a hotter climate.

Plants with wispy leaves such as the T. ionantha, T. andreana, or T. fuchsii v gracilis might need to be misted more frequently in addition to weekly waterings than other plants with larger leaves. 

tillandsia fuchsii v gracilis air plants


  • Misting is simple, just take a spray bottle or a hose attachment on the “mist” setting and lightly mist your plants. When misting, make sure that the entire plant is moistened. As stated before, this is not the best watering method to use if this is their only source of water. If you do mist your plants, make sure to also dunk or soak them at least once a week.

A good rule of thumb to keep in mind is that a healthy air plant will have wide open leaves, while an air plant that is dehydrated will have leaves that curl inwards. If you notice your plant is looking a little dry in between your normal waterings this would be a good time to bring on the mist!

Have questions about watering your air plants? Shoot us an email. info@airplantdesignstudio.com 

Megan Richards
Megan Richards


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